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CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Joey Logano was pushed into the Sprint Cup Series as a fresh-faced, budding superstar barely old enough to drive at NASCARs national level.When Joe Gibbs Racing chose him to replace Tony Stewart in 2009, Logano moved quickly into one of NASCARs top rides with out-of-whack expectations built by glowing recommendations from veteran drivers.It was quickly apparent that Logano would need years to properly fill Stewarts seat at JGR, and the organization had to make a change after four seasons and just two victories. Roger Penske was fast to grab Logano, who has blossomed into the driver many thought hed be when he turned 18 in 2008 and finally became eligible to race at NASCARs top level.Loganos win Sunday at Kansas Speedway was his career-best fifth of the season and earned him an automatic berth into the third round of the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. After the victory, Penske thanked Joe and J.D. Gibbs for giving Logano four years of seat time and breaking him in.Probably have to send (JGR) a check, Penske joked.Logano heads into Saturday nights race at Charlotte Motor Speedway at the top of the Chase rankings and confident hes a legitimate title contender with his No. 22 Team Penske crew. Its a spot Greg Zipadelli always believed Logano could reach.Zipadelli was Stewarts crew chief at JGR and spent three seasons atop the pit box with Logano before Zipadelli moved into a management role at Stewart-Haas Racing.We asked him to do something he probably wasnt ready to do, Zipadelli said. He did the best he could at the time, and I think he got beat up over it.Logano left JGR with 41 top-10 finishes in 144 starts in the No. 20. He also won five poles, but never earned a spot in the Chase. In his first season with Penske last year, he had career-highs in top-fives, top-10s, laps led and made the Chase.I think the change was good for him. He went to a group that was excited about having him a€” not that Gibbs wasnt, but they made different choices, Zipadelli said. We pushed him pretty early. There was never a day I didnt think that kid had talent.___MASON MITCHELL: Mason Mitchell started last winter unsure of his 2014 racing plans and took a gamble leaving his home in Iowa to move to North Carolina to start his own team.The move paid huge dividends as his Mason Mitchell Motorsports team last weekend won the ARCA Racing Series championship.Its unbelievable, Mitchell said. I know there were not too many believers earlier in the year, but we showed them what we were about. I learned so much about myself, living at the race shop and being dedicated. Its just pretty incredible. It takes a lot just to get to the race track.Mitchell finished the season with one win, six second-place finishes and 12 top-five finishes. He also won five poles and his 18 top-10 finishes led all ARCA drivers.Mitchell was solid on every type of track ARCA visited: In two dirt track races, he finished second and fourth. He was 10th on the road course in New Jersey. In nine short track races, he led 449 laps and had seven top-10 finishes.Youre not supposed to do this the first time, Mitchell said. I figured wed be competitive by the end of the race season, but not all year. We never really had a bad day at the race track.___INDYCAR-ENGINE DEVELOPMENT: IndyCar has named Marvin Riley the director of engine development. He will work in developing the rules and performance standards for IndyCar Series engine manufacturers Chevrolet and Honda.Riley, who holds a mechanical engineering degree from Michigan and a business masters from UCLA, has worked the last 10 years as a member of Honda Performance Development. He most recently served as assistant manager of HPDs engine development department, where he was responsible for the execution of all major engine performance specifications and test plans. http://www.officiallionsgear.com/Lions-Deshawn-Shead-Draft-Jersey/ . Lawrie was hit on the hand by Cincinnati pitcher Johnny Cueto in the second inning of Sundays 4-3 loss to the Reds. Taylor Decker Jersey . Modin, 36, tallied seven goals and three assists in 36 games with the Thrashers this season. The Sundsvall, Sweden, native has posted 232 goals and 230 assists in 894 career NHL games with Toronto, Tampa Bay, Columbus, Los Angeles and Atlanta and has appeared in 57 post-season contests, helping the Lightning capture the 2004 Stanley Cup Championship. http://www.officiallionsgear.com/Lions-Ziggy-Ansah-Draft-Jersey/ .C. -- Duke sophomore Rodney Hood is entering the NBA draft. http://www.officiallionsgear.com/Lions-Anthony-Zettel-Draft-Jersey/ . The Swede became the first golfer to win the PGA Tours FedEx Cup and European Tours Race to Dubai in the same season. "It is still taking a little time to sink in what Ive achieved this week as was the case when I won the FedEx Cup but then it just kept getting better and better as the days went on and I am sure this will be the same," he said. http://www.officiallionsgear.com/Lions-Darius-Slay-Draft-Jersey/ . Head coach Randy Carlyle confirmed the news after the Leafs morning skate on Monday. Kozun was hurt during Friday nights home game against the Red Wings and did not make the return trip to Detroit for Saturdays game.SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The Smallrus finally hoisted a big PGA Tour trophy. Kevin Stadler, the 33-year-old son of major champion Craig "The Walrus" Stadler, won the Phoenix Open on Sunday for his first PGA Tour victory. Stadler won when playing partner Bubba Watson missed a five-foot par putt on 18. "It was a little weird way to win a golf tournament," Stadler said. "I fully expected him to make the putt. I would have rather made mine to win it." Stadler closed with a 3-under 68 for a one-stroke victory over Watson and Graham DeLaet of Weyburn, Sask. Watson shot 71, and DeLaet had a 65. "He beat me," Watson said. "Hes a great player." Stadler won in his 239th tour start, earning a spot in the Masters -- a tournament his father won in 1982. The Stadlers are the ninth father-son winners in tour history and will be the first to play in the same Masters. "Its going to great for me because its really my last one," said Craig Stadler, a 13-time PGA Tour winner with nine Champions Tour victories. "I kept saying, When he gets in, thats my last one. ... Im proud of him. Its awesome." Kevin Stadler finished at 16-under 268 at TPC Scottsdale, his home course. Raised in Colorado, he played in Denver Broncos colours, wearing an orange shirt and blue pants and hat. What was he thinking when Watson was standing over his par putt on 18? "How long the playoff was going to take and how long until I can watch the football game?" Stadler said. After Stadler and Watson each saved par after hitting into the water on the par-5 15th, Stadler tied Watson for the lead with a par on the par-3 16th hole. Watson hit into the front left bunker on the stadium hole and his six-footer missed to the left. At the 347-yard 17th, they each drove the green and two-putted for birdie from 90 feet -- Watson holing out from 18 feet and Stadler from 5. On the par-4 18th, Stadler hit his 110-yard approach to the back right pin to 10 feet. Watson drove into the right rough and hammered his 120-yard second over the green. Watson bladed his shot from the trampled rough into the bank next to the green and it ran five feet past the hole. After Stadler missed his birdie try and tapped in for par, Watsons par try slid by the left side. ";I thought I hit a good putt, but obviously I misread that, too," Watson said.dddddddddddd Stadler birdied the par-4 ninth to take a one-stroke lead over Watson, but fell behind with a double bogey on the par-4 11th. Stadler took a penalty stroke for an unplayable lie after driving into a Buckhorn Cholla and missed a 4-foot bogey try. "Cactus and short putt and all that was on one hole," Stadler said. "Eleven has had my number for years. I butcher that hole every year." Stadler likely will move up high enough in the world ranking to get one of the last spots in the 64-man Match Play Championship this month outside Tucson. Stadlers previous biggest win was in Australia in the European Tours 2006 Johnnie Walker Classic. In that event, he hit a 3-iron to a foot for an eagle on the final hole for a two-stroke victory. He also won the Argentine Open that winter and has four Nationwide Tour wins. "Its been a long time since I won anything," Stadler said. "Its pretty special." Watson is winless since the 2012 Masters. "I was a challenging day," Watson said. "Again, its the same thing, just waiting on every tee box and waiting on every shot." Hunter Mahan and Japans Hideki Matsuyama tied for fourth at 14 under. Mahan, the 2010 winner, finished with a 68, and Matsuyama shot 69. DeLaet bogeyed the 15th after hitting into the water, but rallied with birdies on the final two holes. He also tied for second last week at Torrey Pines. "I have been playing well for the last few months," DeLaet said. "I really feel like I worked super hard in the off-season. Its nice to see it paying off." Phil Mickelson closed with a 71 to tie for 42nd at 3 under. Lefty was making his 25th appearance in the event he won in 1996, 2005 and 2013. "My game is not far off, even though the score says that it is," Mickelson said. "It was just a fraction off." He showed no signs of the back pain that forced him to withdraw at Torrey Pines, and will play next week at Pebble Beach. "Back feels great," Mickelson said. The event drew an estimated 563,008 fans, breaking the seven-day record of 538,356 set in 2008. The tournament drew a golf-record 189,722 on Saturday and 60,232 on Sunday. Cheap Hockey Blackhawks Jerseys Cheap Hockey Avalanche Jerseys Cheap Hockey Stars Jerseys Cheap Hockey Wild Jerseys Cheap Hockey Predators Jerseys Cheap Hockey Blues Jerseys Cheap Hockey Jets Jerseys Cheap Hockey Ducks Jerseys Cheap Hockey Coyotes Jerseys Cheap Hockey Flames Jerseys Cheap Hockey Oilers Jerseys Cheap Hockey Kings Jerseys Cheap Hockey Sharks Jerseys Cheap Hockey Canucks Jerseys Cheap Hockey Golden Knights Jerseys Hockey Team Canada Jerseys ' ' '


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Sam 29 Sep 2018 - 08:29
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RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. -- Shanshan Feng was alone in her opinion about the pin positions in the Kraft Nabisco Championship. She was by herself atop the leaderboard, too. "The pin positions werent that hard," the 24-year-old Chinese player said. Feng had little trouble Thursday in perfect morning conditions at Mission Hills, shooting a 6-under 66 to take a one-stroke lead over Michelle Wie and Se Ri Pak. Defending champion Inbee Park voiced the majority opinion after an opening 74. "The pin positions were very tough for the first day," Park said. "Half of the pins, we couldnt go at. There were very tough pins out there." Cristie Kerr agreed after her morning round in the first major of the year. "The pin on 3 today, it doesnt matter if you hit a pitching wedge, it would be hard to get to, and were hitting 6- and 7- irons in," said Kerr, tied for sixth after a 69. "The pin on 1 is like 2 yards from the right side of the green. ... Do they have to be that severe? Maybe not, but theyre probably compensating for the fact that theres not much rough." Feng had seven birdies and a bogey. "This morning, it was playing easier because there was no wind," Feng said. Feng won the 2012 LPGA Championship to become the tours first Chinese winner and had two victories late last year. She tied for 16th last week in Carlsbad, her best finish of the season. "The beginning of this year I was kind of a little lost because I lost a little weight and my swing kind of changed a little," Feng said. "I wasnt swinging very comfortably." Angel Yin, a 15-year-old high school freshman from the Los Angeles suburb of Arcadia, was two strokes back at 68 with Amy Yang. Yin was asked if there was a player she wanted to meet, but was too shy to approach. "Michelle Wie," Yin said. "If she sat next to me and said Hi to me, Id probably run." The 24-year-old Wie laughed when told about Yins response. "Its crazy," Wie said. "These girls are starting to make me feel really old." Wie played a four-hole stretch in 5 under, showing off all the talent that made her a star in her early teens and helped attract players like Yin to golf. "I just felt comfortable out there," Wie said. Wie stalled at the end, lipping out a 3-foot par putt on the par-3 17th and settling for par on the par-5 18th. "Ill take a 67 here," Wie said Wie birdied the par-5 ninth and par-4 10th, made a 25-foot eagle putt on the par-5 11th and moved into a tie for the lead with a 15-foot birdie putt on the par-4 12th. She got up-and-down for par from near a steep face in a bunker on the par-4 15th, hitting to 1 1/2 feet with her left foot almost 2 feet above her right. "Just was aggressive on the holes I needed to be and conservative on the other holes," Wie said Wie is making her 12th start in the tournament. She was ninth in 2003 at age 13, fourth the following year and tied for third at 16 in 2006. "I think when youre younger youre kind of fearless," Wie said. "You dont know what failure is." Wie has two LPGA Tour victories, winning the 2009 Lorena Ochoa Invitational in Mexico and the 2010 Canadian Womens Open. She has been in the top 16 in all five of her starts this year, finishing a season-best fourth in Thailand. "Im so grateful to have rounds like these," Wie said. Paired with 58-year-old Hall of Famer Amy Alcott, Feng rebounded from a bogey on 15 with a birdie on par-4 16th. "I made a bogey on 15, and she was like, OK, lets make two birdies back in the last three holes," Feng said. "I was like, Yes, maam." Alcott shot an 81 in her 36th start in the event she won in 1983, 1988 and 1991. In 1988, she became the first player to take the now-traditional victory leap into Poppies Pond. "She was very sweet starting off and we were talkative," Alcott said. "She hits it very solid. Just a very, very talented young player." The 36-year-old won the last of her five major titles in 2006. "Just a solid round," Pak said. "The greens got a little firmer, but I got pretty good distance control." Anna Nordqvist, the winner in Carlsbad for her second victory of the year, opened with a 71. Playing partner Stacy Lewis, the 2011 winner, had a 73. Lewis struggled off the tee, hitting drives to the right. "If I can straighten out my driver Ill be right there," Lewis said. Sixteen-year-old Lydia Ko and Hall of Famer Karrie Webb, also a two-time winner this year, were in the group at 73. Marquette King Broncos Jersey . Appearing on TSN 690 Monday afternoon, Mike Babcock said he had conversations with both P.K. Subban and Carey Price about those on-ice traits during Hockey Canadas summer orientation camp. Mike Babcock: McGill experience, P. Case Keenum Jersey . The 26-year-old Sobotka injured his left leg playing for the St. Louis Blues in a 3-1 loss to the Carolina Hurricanes on Friday. The Blues said he would not recover from the injury in time for the Olympic tournament. http://www.broncosrookiestore.com/Broncos-Case-Keenum-Jersey/ . -- San Francisco 49ers offensive co-ordinator Greg Roman is a finalist to replace Joe Paterno at Penn State, his agent said Monday. Isaac Yiadom Jersey .com) - Jeff Teague had 25 points, eight rebounds and seven assists as the Atlanta Hawks defeated the Milwaukee Bucks 90-85 on Saturday night. Bradley Chubb Jersey . Appearing on TSN 1050 on Tuesday, Sean McAdam of Comcast SportsNet New England reported that the Blue Jays, along with a number of other playoff contenders were in the mix for the Boston ace.Soldiers, veterans and members of the public are gathering across the country and around the world to pay their respects at the 11th minute of the 11th hour of the 11th day of November - to pay tribute to the 1.5 million Canadians who have served their country since the start of the First World War. Earlier this year, TSNs Michael Landsberg made a special trip with his family to Beny-Sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery in France - the permanent resting place for Canadian soldiers killed during the early part of the Battle of Normandy in the Second World War. And on this day, Michael shares his thoughts on that visit. Whether its in the realm of sports or in any other aspect of our society, today - like any other day - provides the chance to reflect upon those who gave their lives for our freedom and those who continue to do so today. Lest We Forget. I stood mesmerized by the emotional hologram, called Beny-Sur-Mer, the Canadian war cemetery near Juno Beach. Was this place hell dressed up to look like heaven, or was this heaven as the final journey from hell? Like a hologram, it was all about how you viewed it. I came to look beyond the beauty, beyond the flowers and the spectacular trees standing at attention honoring the men who would spend eternity under them. The simple beauty of this was blinding and that was the purpose. This to me, is the paradox of the war cemetery. On the surface, there is a carefree calm. But it is a deception, a ruse, a mask, designed to somehow give comfort to the grieving loved ones who visit. They stand above a six-foot no mans land dividing the living from the pain of the dead. The hologram showed all of us different things, depending on what we came looking for. Standing on the edge of the cemetery, I realized one had a choice. I looked at the rows and rows of dead and thought there are two ways to absorb it. The easy way is to stand and look at the headstones as a group, the same way you would look at a forest. That way you see its entirety, not the individual trees. Its easy if you cant see the trees for the forest. Now pick a headstone. Read the words, but look beyond the words, and consider what it all means. Really think about what this represents. Its not just about how he died, but rather how he might have lived. Make him human. Now it hurts. Now you cant see the forest for the trees. You know whats worse than imagining six million Jews killed? Learning about one. A number doesnt hurt the way a person does. Above the ground, acknowledgements of God are everywhere with every headstone marked by a religious sign. Every single one had either a cross or a Star of David. Was there not a single family who didnt feel like celebrating God? I watched an old man, standing over a grave make the sign of the cross. His hands were slowed by time and likely a pain that went far deeper than just his joints. I was glad for him that he found comfort in communicating with his God. I wondered whether I could make a thankful gesture to the Lord, over a heart that perhaps he had broken. I found Gods role confusing. I always find Gods role confusing, but more so in this place called Beny-Sur-Mer, a few thousand kilometres from my home and a million from what I have lived. This place, more than other cemeteries, was confusing to me because no one could gain solace or strength from saying, "He lived a good life, it was his time." Everyone in these graves went too soon. Each one a tragedy that spread out in a hundred directions: To Mom and Dad back home who had cried with joy at the birth of their son just a heartbeat ago. To brothers and sisters wondering why big brother isnt in his spot at the table. To grandparents who had rejoiced at his birth, volunteering immediately to babysit. Here in these graves lies not one soul, but many. Because when he was buried, so too were pieces of the people who loved him. There are 2,049 graves in Beny-Sur-Mer, all of them like elected officials, representing a much larger constituency back home. My experiences here and at the American War Cemetery, near Omaha Beach, were some of the most important of my life. I had studied World War II and D-Day, in particular, for the past five years - often until the mornings wee hours. While others slept, in the quiet of my home, I spent hour after hour trying to gain enough knowledge to transport me back decades. I wanted to better understand what it was like to be one of those boys, who would never live long enough to learn that they had been part of the greatest generation. I have often felt guilty about my passion for this war. It is not wrong to be stimulated by a thirst for knowledge about something that poisoned a generation? I thought I knew a lot, but as I took my first step into these sacred grounds I realized, while I knew many facts about the war, I actually knew next to nothing about what war did to those who volunteered to risk everything. And they did it not because of a letter that told them they had to fight. They went willingly, proudly and knowingly. Yes, knowingly. These kids were all products of another war generation. World War I still haunted their homes and their world. Yes, these young men had booked a ticket to hell knowing what lay ahead. I believe my generation has always felt both an awe and inferiority to this group of men and women. Have any of us not wondered - could I have done what they did? Have any of us not thought there is no way we could have shown the same bravery they did? There is no answer because, while hours earlier I had walked a mile on the same shores that they walked, I didnt even walk an inch in their shoes. I came to this spot wanting to learn. Acquiring knowledge though is like drinking salt water. The more you drink, the thirstier you get for more. The more I learned, the more I needed to learn. I was not content to read the headstones, telling me who was buried, but not revealing in any way who that person was. I felt like I owed more to these soldiers, these men, these boys of the greatest generation. Before I actually stepped a second foot into the Canadian cemetery, I was forced to do a double take. I have always wondered if these men buried here were in any way different than men buried in other countrys cemeteries. And there it was. The answer. Sitting there amongst the wreaths and letters, amongst the homemade crosses and flowers was a hat. All of these things were placed there to provide comfort for the living. We come to cemeteries, or at least I do, based on some kind of hopeful assumption that the dead will know we were there. Wishful thinking perhaps, but comforting just the same. This was perfect. The hat. Not just a hat but also a sign, a statement, a bridge between generations. My son and I saw it at the same time. Thats my son Corey, one of several hundred 27-year-olds in the cemetery at that time. The difference between him and the others was that they were losers of the random lottery-of-conception which dictated they were born in 1917 in Canada. Being part of the greatest generation came with quite a price tag. Corey and I were both captured immediately by the Team Canada 2010 hat. What is it that makes a group of Canadians different than groups from other countries? What are the qualities that we possess that others dont? Qualities that we have been gifted with, through some process, half Darwin, half Tim Hortons. If ever there was a Team Canada, it was the one that landed on Juno Beach. I asked our French guide, a remarkable man with astounding knowledge of the battle for Normandy, how Canadians fared compared to other nations. He said Canadians were the bravest, the most committed and the most willing to die for the buddy beside them. Was he speaking of a Canadian rifleman, or a Canadian infantryman or a Canadian hockey player? How do we describe a Canadian style of hockey? We know if you win the small battles, you usually win the war. If you have your buddys back, he will have yours. Take a hit to give a hit. Better still; take a hit to make a play for your teammate. And most of all we Canadians know that youre playing for the uniform not the name on it. Those buried in Beny-Sur-Mer could have been many things - wingers, defencemen, goalies, but they were soldiers. Looking at Corey and Casey and Karen, I thought about the victims of war who were never buried in graves and celebrated- the victims who lay awake at night wondering where their child was. What parent hasnt been frantic with worry 20 minutes after curfew? What kind of hell must it have been to be a parent with a child in Europe between 1939 and 1945? But especially on June 6, 1944. To be huddled around the radio, listening to words they all wanted to hear but dreadedd hearing - “Allied naval forces began landing this morning on the northern coast of France.dddddddddddd” Was this the beginning of the end of their nightmare, or was this simply the end? I looked at my son standing beside John Martin. John is the son of George and Cora Martin. He is younger than Corey, just 22, but they have a few things in common - they both love sports, love hockey and both love the Toronto Maple Leafs. And they both have the same crappy handwriting, and both appear to enjoy posing for the camera. Thats where the similarities end - Coreys hair is blond and straight and Johns is as wavy as, well the English Channel on June 6, 1944. John loved to sing as his mom played the piano, while Corey has never sung a note. The other big difference is that John is dead. I had searched for Johns grave after tweeting a week in advance that I was visiting Beny-Sur-Mer and would be honored to visit a loved ones grave. I didnt know anyone buried there and I felt like my trip would have more meaning and purpose if I could pay my respects. So I heard from a Rob Owens, whose uncle was buried there. His name: was John G. Martin. Standing at Johns grave, I was struck by how small it seemed. Just a narrow plot of land, a small gift to John from the French for giving his life to liberate their country. Standing there, lost in my own thoughts, I was confused. I looked around me and saw the people I loved most in the world and I realized what the confusion was - how could a grave that small ever contain all of the souls who were lost? Buried in that grave was not a single soul but parts of so many souls. For each one of the graves, there are so many whose hopes and dreams in life were killed by the same Nazi bullet that killed John. So now, I had met John G. Martin. Well, actually I had met a block of stone measuring 32 inches high, 15 inches wide and 3 inches thick. This told me little more than what the Geneva convention told John he had to give the enemy if he was captured: name, rank and serial number. Every headstone looked the same - the military cemetery may be one of the only places I have seen where the class system does not exist. Even the military hierarchy is absent. Every headstone is identical to the next. Row on row, they stand. There are no rich and no poor, no old money or new money. Money is a worthless currency here. Was it Thomas Jefferson who declared, “All men are destroyed equal?” I felt like I owed John more than what the headstone could tell me. So after returning home I asked Johns nephew Rob if I could see any mementos saved by his mom - who was Johns sister. He gladly obliged and when we met he handed me three large envelopes. I was excited and afraid to see what was inside and mostly felt undeserving of seeing what was there. When I got home, I emptied the contents of the larger envelopes onto my dining room table. There was now a large pile of letters, notes, pictures and newspaper clippings. I paused to take it all in. I was shocked to feel a far greater sense of sorrow standing over this pile of Johns history than I did standing over Johns grave. Here on my dining room table, where we have gathered a hundred times to celebrate the joy of living, here lay John G. Martin - son, brother, friend, hero. There were big and small envelopes and they all somehow looked so dignified. In 1944, mail somehow appeared more formal, more crisp, more important. I couldnt possibly share all I learned from this collection of history. In fact, I learned more from these 47 letters, 63 pictures and 45 newspaper clippings than I had learned from everything previous. I felt like a fool, having believed I understood anything about war. I will, however tell you about one letter. It somehow stood out from the rest. Im not sure why, but I just knew. It was standard 9” x 4” letter size. The kind of envelope you get bills in all the time. This was the largest bill ever paid. I wondered how it was delivered. Likely from a friendly face who might, on most days, hand over his mail with a “Good morning, Mr. Martin.” Did he hand it to him on this day? Did he look him in the eyes? Would he be scarred for life from passing along letters, some of which contained bombs that would explode after he was safely down the street? I held it in my hand, likely the same way Johns father did 69 years ago. I still didnt know what was inside, but somehow I knew. On the envelope it said simply: Mr. George Arthur Martin,Pickering, Ontario. Yes, this was a simpler time. A time when the post office knew where George Arthur Martins home was. And therefore they all knew that home being where the heart is, this letter might be destined to kill a part of everyone who read it. The envelope was torn in the corner and then cut neatly across with what I assume was a letter opener. I wondered how Johns dad had opened it? We all treat dread differently. Did he want to get it over with quickly, or did he want to hold onto hope as long as he could? I used my thumbs to separate the two sides of the envelope. I was sick. Sick for every parent who had ever done this. As I held it I thought of my own fears as a parent and my own demons all of a sudden seemed to return. What I held was every tragedy that war has ever caused. The tragedy of a parent, holding a paper whose weight was just a few grams but carried the weight of the world. Those who would send our young off to war should hold this paper. I thought of my own tortured moments as a parent. I thought of waiting with Karen in a doctors office, waiting to hear a diagnosis on Caseys eyes. I thought back to a night when Corey was out late and the phone rang and call display showed the police department. I thought of all of that. The unknown, the waiting, the fear, the helplessness - and I was crippled by sadness for the Martins, for all the Martins. The paper was folded twice - still standard procedure for placing letters in envelopes. The folds were deep and fitting. Their depth was a sign of the 69 years they had held the paper closed. Fitting because like folds in a furrowed brow, they strained from both the weight of time and the weight of the words written on the page. I slowly unfolded it. Looking at my hands I was surprised how old they appeared. These hands had held my children for a thousand hours each. They had thrown baseballs to Corey, helped Casey up onto a horse. They were well worn. The way they should be. I looked at the letter as a whole. Just a bunch of words, but words have the power to devastate, to kill, every bit as much as the famed German machine guns that killed so many of our boys on Juno beach so long ago. I looked at the top, again wondering how George Martin had looked at it. Did his eyes linger over the first six lines? They meant nothing. Did he fool himself into thinking it wouldnt get any worse? Department of National DefenceArmyOttawa, 23rd June, 1944Mr. George Arthur Martin,Pickering, Ont.Dear Mr. Martin. I stopped there. Again my thoughts werent mine by choice, but rather like I was being held down and forced to view a movie of my life. I saw Corey beside me at a hockey game. I saw Casey giving a speech as valedictorian. How could I go on? How could anyone go on? This was a moment that should never exist. I breathed in through my nose and out through my mouth, trying to prepare for the words I knew lay ahead. Had George Martin done the same? “It is with deep regret…” Nothing after that really mattered. “It is with deep regret,” the five most powerful words ever spoken. Five words that John, Cora, Helen and Mary Martin would carry with them for eternity. “It is with deep regret that I learned of the death of your son, B64089 Rifleman John Gordon Martin who gave his life in the Service of his Country in France on the 6th day of June, 1944.” This was the Emancipation Proclamation of their lives in reverse. They were now destined to be slaves to this letter for life. On this Remembrance Day, 2013, I will remember, not just the thousands of John G. Martins, but the many, many more who gave the ultimate sacrifice as well. Death doesnt just come when the heart stops, it comes when the heart is broken. In my hand I felt like I held the meaning of war. After a billion words written, after all the movies - this war, every war could be summed up in 14 words. It didnt matter whether the words were typed on a letter, written by hand, spoken at the door or perhaps never even conveyed, but just assumed - war was hell, even if you dressed it up to look like heaven. "It is with deep regret that I learned of the death of your son..." otr@tsn.ca Cheap Hockey Blackhawks Jerseys Cheap Hockey Avalanche Jerseys Cheap Hockey Stars Jerseys Cheap Hockey Wild Jerseys Cheap Hockey Predators Jerseys Cheap Hockey Blues Jerseys Cheap Hockey Jets Jerseys Cheap Hockey Ducks Jerseys Cheap Hockey Coyotes Jerseys Cheap Hockey Flames Jerseys Cheap Hockey Oilers Jerseys Cheap Hockey Kings Jerseys Cheap Hockey Sharks Jerseys Cheap Hockey Canucks Jerseys Cheap Hockey Golden Knights Jerseys Hockey Team Canada Jerseys ' ' '


Sam 29 Sep 2018 - 08:31
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Message eagle on the final hole

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